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What is a good IDE or source code editor?


dartomic
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I was using VS Code for a while, but I just tried Kate and realized that I like it a lot better. I want to know what else people like a lot, even if it's for the terminal, and even if it requires a lot of learning. If it does require a lot of learning, I would like to know what features might make it worth the effort to learn the application.

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On 2021, I used these editors:

  • vim
  • gedit
  • notepad++
  • atom
  • VS Studio Code
  • kate

I like notepad ++ because in case of catastrophic failure, it does remember the contents of all files I was working on, even the changes I haven't saved yet.

I had been using atom for several months, and I still like it so much.

I used VS Studio Code for a while, but I am not still convinced of it.

Right now, I am using kate and I feel it matches all my needs (except the great memory feature of notepad++, unfortunately) and I bet I will stick to it for a long while. I customized the default options and made it atom-like, but I feel I'm distilled open source and that makes me happy. Also, I love the icon set and the minimap. I abandoned atom because I didn't like the available mindmap addons.

 

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On 12/13/2021 at 5:07 PM, drobbins said:

I use pycharm professional (paid) because I do a lot of python. The JetBrains editors are pretty good and a 'sweet spot' in terms of functionality and usability. The python-code-related features really are helpful.

I don't know Python, but I see a lot of job postings for it. I really like C, but I haven't seen many jobs for C programmers unless I learn more math and assembly to work for a video game company. But I have seen a lot of people say good things about PyCharm. I'll have to get into that when I get into writing more advanced stuff in Python later.

Is it safe to assume that anything below Python 3 is pointless to learn, if they're different? I'm not really sure if they're different languages.

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On 12/12/2021 at 1:19 PM, gatolinux said:

On 2021, I used these editors:

  • vim
  • gedit
  • notepad++
  • atom
  • VS Studio Code
  • kate

I like notepad ++ because in case of catastrophic failure, it does remember the contents of all files I was working on, even the changes I haven't saved yet.

I had been using atom for several months, and I still like it so much.

I used VS Studio Code for a while, but I am not still convinced of it.

Right now, I am using kate and I feel it matches all my needs (except the great memory feature of notepad++, unfortunately) and I bet I will stick to it for a long while. I customized the default options and made it atom-like, but I feel I'm distilled open source and that makes me happy. Also, I love the icon set and the minimap. I abandoned atom because I didn't like the available mindmap addons.

 

VS Studio Code does that as well, I think. I haven't used it in a while. But I do like it a lot. I like Kate a lot too. Vim seems cool, I just don't know how to use all of it's features yet.

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On 12/9/2021 at 11:43 AM, seemant said:

I use atom and vim mainly. I tried codium for a bit, but I guess you really need vscode to run the various plugins to make it useful

I haven't heard of codium. I'll have to check that out when I get some time to dedicate to programming again.

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  • Funtoo Linux BDFL
On 1/24/2022 at 1:46 AM, dartomic said:

I don't know Python, but I see a lot of job postings for it. I really like C, but I haven't seen many jobs for C programmers unless I learn more math and assembly to work for a video game company. But I have seen a lot of people say good things about PyCharm. I'll have to get into that when I get into writing more advanced stuff in Python later.

Is it safe to assume that anything below Python 3 is pointless to learn, if they're different? I'm not really sure if they're different languages.

Generally you'd be learning Python 3 if you started now. There are just some minor syntax incompatibilities in the core language and there were other minor changes. And python3 has more features and extensions, and most modules work best with 3 now (many have stopped supporting 2.x.)

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